1970s 5 results
3Score

Shaft proves even manufactured icons can find soul

Movie Review: Shaft Who’s the black private dick that’s a sex magnet to all the chicks? You’re damn right. It’s Shaft, a manufactured icon that’s organically adapting to the times, and reflecting an African-American identity in the midst of transition.

Shaft changes generational gears as millennial meets classic MOFO

Movie Review: Shaft Who’s the black private dick that’s a sex magnet to all the chicks? You’re damn right. It’s Shaft, a manufactured icon that’s organically adapting to the times, and reflecting an African-American identity in the midst of transition.
4Score

Rocketman showers glitter on Elton John’s glorious whole

Movie Review: Rocketman Director Dexter Fletcher swallows some of the uglier truths about the arena rock sensation that defined the 1970s in an entertaining spectacle that brings real feeling to what many considered a pop music sausage factory.

Bidding Adieu to Dave Barrett

Tribute: Dave Barrett Funerals for public figures can often be stuffy affairs with formal speechmaking and half-hearted appeals to emotion, but the recent ceremonies for B.C.’s former premier were rife with real affection. By Rod Mickleburgh So, farewell then, Dave Barrett. A month after the remarkable NDP leader passed away, it was time for the public to bid adieu, formally and informally. The official state memorial in Victoria came first, followed the next day by what was more a gathering of the clans at Vancouver’s Croatian Cultural Centre, not that far from where Dave Barrett grew up on the city’s rough-and-tumble east side. Both events were packed, befitting the immeasurable contribution he made to the province of British Columbia during his short 39 months as its first socialist premier. (Unlike today’s New Democrats, he never shied from using the term “socialist.”) Beyond his political legacy, there was an outpouring of real affection for someone who had ...

Paul McCartney biography blows up Beatles lore

Book Review: Paul McCartney: The Life by Philip Norman When Philip Norman first wrote about The Beatles in his 1981 book Shout, he earned Paul's wrath by claiming John Lennon was "three-quarters" of the band, but 25 years later he sets the creative record straight by hailing Paul as the boundary-breaking Beatle