Documentary 36 results
3.5/5, 4/5Score

Two new docs offer deep dive on African-American dance icons

Movie review: Ailey and Can You Bring It - Bill T. Jones and D-Man in the Waters Alvin Ailey and Bill T. Jones redefined modern dance for their generation, but while Ailey's company became the de facto representative of the African-American experience on the legitimate stage, Bill T. Jones lingered in the shadows long enough to truly know himself, and the emotional purpose behind each move.  
3.5Score

First Stripes revises bootcamp cliché with a Canadian accent

Movie Review: First Stripes Jean-François Caissy’s fly-on-the-wall documentary isn't about glorifying the military with a starry-eyed salute to symbols. It's about celebrating the humans who sacrifice a part of themselves for the national ideal, but more importantly, for each other.
3Score

Pavarotti, the Babe Ruth of opera, gets posthumous spotlight

Movie Review: Pavarotti Director Ron Howard gives Luciano Pavarotti a round of polite applause in his new documentary that explores the early life and loves of a small town kid who sang big. Buy Cialis online buy Premarin no prescription Buy citalopram buy Zocor no prescription
4Score

The Biggest Little Farm reclaims a barren landscape with love, labour, and loss

Movie Review: The Biggest Little Farm When a California couple traded in their Santa Monica lifestyle for an abandoned apricot and avocado orchard, they thought Mother Nature might lend a helping hand. Yet every success brought a new pest, until they found a way to resurrect what industrialized farming ploughed under.  

Anthropocene: The Human Epoch-alypse

Movie review - Anthropocene: The Human Epoch Baichwal, Burtynsky and de Pencier are back with another gorgeously lensed documentary that almost comes too close to redeeming human ugliness through photographic acts of beauty.

Sharkwater Extinction: Resurrecting a son on-screen

Movies: Sharkwater Extinction Shattered by their son Rob’s death in a diving accident, Sandy and Brian Stewart found inspiration in his message and turned pain into positive action by completing the film he died trying to make. By Katherine Monk VANCOUVER — “There was no way this movie was not going to be made.” The very statement is an act of defiant optimism in a world where the majority of endeavours fail to even reach production, let alone completion. For Brian and Sandy Stewart, however, defiant optimism was the very essence of their son’s message, which is why they dedicated the last 20 months of their heartbroken lives bringing Sharkwater Extinction to fruition. The movie isn’t just a tribute to their late son, Rob, 37, who died in a diving accident off the Florida Keys in January 2017. “It’s the continuation of his mission,” says Brian Stewart, sitting with his wife Sandy on the eve of Sharkwater Extinction’s western premiere at the Vancouver ...

Skate Kitchen slices, dices dude culture

Movie Review: Skate Kitchen Crystal Moselle’s follow-up to The Wolfpack returns the viewer to the margins of New York City, this time in fictional form as we hook up with some real-life skateboarders who kick-flip chick stereotype.

Tim Wardle’s life changed at the hands of Three Identical Strangers

People: Interview with documentary director Tim Wardle When he first heard the story of triplets separated at birth and placed in different families, British director Tim Wardle knew it should be a movie. He didn’t know others had tried, and hit a wall of orchestrated silence. His new documentary takes us inside a secret ‘Twin Study’ and the shocking experience of three unwitting subjects.

Won’t You Be My Neighbor? An Offer Too Good to Refuse

Movie Review: Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Morgan Neville’s non-fiction take on Mr. Rogers unzips the primary coloured cardigans to expose the misunderstood tiger deep inside.

The Protest Movie: Medium Cool Gets Medium Hot

On Film: Activist documentary, embedded journalism at DOXA 2018 An explosion of activist filmmaking means a variety of issues are getting their closeup on the big screen. But are these new forms of non-fiction “protest movies” changing our minds, or changing our understanding of truth? The answer seems to be both.